AEM EV FAQs

Currently we can control any of the Cascadia PM family of inverters. Find a full list here.
An inverter is the “controller” that takes High voltage DC power in from the battery and outputs a regulated AC voltage, the AEM VCU communicates with the inverter via CAN bus to control power delivery and implement both Performance and safety features. A link to Cascadia inverters is here.
Please shoot us an email at sales@aemev.com, as the VCU evolves and development continues we will make firmware available for popular applications.
A battery management system or BMS, is recommended for battery health and safety but is not required. We have used the Orion BMS2 extensively, their BMS works well and we have all the integration done into our VCU system. The Isabellenhuett IVT-S Series Smart Shunt has also been used for battery management and as an integrated current, voltage and temperature sensor in conjunction with a BMS. If you are using a BMS system not currently supported, please contact us at sales@aemev.com and we can work to add support for your BMS system. Please note: the CAN data will be required for your BMS in order for us to implement.
Yes, We like the EMP WP32 water pumps. We can control the speed of these via CAN.
Yes, A DC-DC converter is recommended so you can use the high voltage pack to power the low voltage 12v accessories such as the AEM VCU, AEM PDU-8, and AEM CD-7. We recommend the Delphi 2.2kW DC/DC Converter. Think of this as the alternator on your ICE.
Resistor value will vary depending on the voltage level and internal capacitance of the inverter. The required value will likely be a recommendation from the inverter manufacturer. For example, the Cascadia PM250 Inverters specify a 1000- ohm pre-charge resistor with an 800v system and a 500-ohm resistor when using that same inverter with a 400v system.
Both of these units are recommended by AEM EV: ARCOL 50W Aluminum Resistors The Gigavac mini-tactor is used for the contactor that controls the pre-charge system. This is used in conjunction with the resistor.
The contactor is the high current relay that turns on /off the high voltage from the battery pack to the inverter. Gigavac are the go-to for contactors, especially the GX Series units with Aux feedback signals. The AEM VCU will use this Aux feedback for confirmation that the contactor has closed. We primarily use this on the negative contactor as the positive state is inferred through the model logic.
Yes the AEM CD-7 and CD-5 Digital Display units can show and log all parameters that are output by the VCU. Check them out here.
We have found late model Ford pedals to be the most consistent and reliable. 2016+ Mustang pedals work well. These also happen to be the same pedals Tesla uses on their vehicles.

Ford Part Number: CR3Z9F836C
We like the Ford two-position brake switch from a 2016+ Mustang. These have two brake switch inputs that we use as inverse signals so that we have double confirmation signals, much like you do with a DBW Accelerator pedal.

Ford Part Number: GL3Z13480A
Our CAN Keypad, PN: 30-8400. Discrete inputs (switches) into the VCU may be wired directly to the VCU in the case where a keypad is not being used. The models in the VCU currently support both methods.
The VCU can select between 4 PowerMode maps for accelerator mapping, and includes user-configurable traction control. For indirect-drive applications (like a manual or automatic transmission) the VCU includes burnout control and launch control (similar to 2-step in gas-engine vehicles).
The VCU has inputs for Hall Effect Speed sensors for both driven and non-driven wheel speeds.
We have used the Thunderstruck EV J1772 connector and it’s a well-made piece. You can find it here.